Parenting Myths that We All Believe

Parents receive all types of advice from countless sources. Some of these nuggets of information are invaluable while others can hinder rather than help …

Here we look at common parenting myths that we’ve all fallen for over the years to clear up the misconceptions once and for all!

 Other parents don’t always tell the truth

If you listened to all the other mums and dads at the school gates you’d drive yourself mad. Sometimes it’s a good idea to take advice from an older family member rather than listen to other parents.

If you have a grandparent who lives an independent life in a McCarthy and Stone apartment, you may find that their experience is practical and helpful. No child is perfect, and grandparents can help if you’re worried about your child’s behaviour and development.

An article in The Daily Mail actually discovered that 90% of new mums lie when asked about their children so it’s important to bear that in mind at the school gate!

 You don’t need to play with your kids 24/7

 There is a common misconception that children have to be entertained at all times. This is most definitely not the case and kids should be encouraged to use their imaginations and creativity to develop their own games and activities.

Anyone who has listened to a child’s made up stories or seen what they can do with a box of paints should realise that kids are quite able to entertain themselves for short periods of time and this is a great way to stimulate their development and growth too!

It gets easier with practice

 Although you can understand the logic behind this argument, the truth is that every child is different and you may struggle more with your second-born than you did with your first. The trick is not to rush any decisions and remember that raising a child is an honour that you should relish.

Working parents harm the family

Most parents go out to work in order to pay the bills, support the family lifestyle and fulfil their own intellectual and social needs. For years a working mother was portrayed as a bad mother but research published in The Independent shows that “as the percentage of mothers in work has gone up, any impact on children has diminished”.

This means mums can stop feeling guilty about supporting their family and choosing to have a career and a family. In today’s modern world it is more than possible to have both!

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